Simple Pork Roast Recipe

September 28, 2014

pork-roast-mainThere’s been a lot of eating here but nothing to blog about. Balancing life and work is not easy especially when there is only 24 hours in a day and you need at least 6-8 of it for sleeping and another 8 for working and another 8 for family and life.  Luckily there is always time to eat tucked in somewhere the hours for family and life, yes? And the cool weekend with the sun making a cameo throughout the day inspired me to make something warm, hearty and delicious.  Our summer days are numbered..le sigh!

I went to Whole Foods and saw an incredible deal on whole pork leg roasts. Weighing at 2.5lbs for under 20 bucks is pretty good deal in my books, especially since it’s organic, local and ethically raised. This was going to feed about 4-6 people or 4-6 dinners. I wanted to honour this animal with a simple pork roast recipe. Simplicity and back-to-basics was my aim here so I rubbed the lovely pork with some salt, pepper, minced fresh garlic, yellow mustard powder and dried thyme. These are complementary flavours that just cannot go wrong for roast meats. You can rub the spice liberally over the outside of the roast but I like to take it up a notch by butterflying the meat so I can season the inside as well. You can omit this step and it’ll still taste pretty grand but I do recommend that if you can muster up the effort to do so, do so. Use twines to tie up the roast to keep it tight and even all around. You do not have to do this but since the recipe is such a simple one, it makes a difference to the end result when you do the little things like making sure the roasting surface is even by tying it with twine, rubbing and seasoning the meat well inside and out, browning it for flavour, giving the roast enough space to cook evenly all around and using low and steady heat to ensure a moist and tender end result.

TL;DR: Every little step contributes to a better product if it’s a simple recipe.

Pair the pork roast and its juices with rice, pasta, potatoes (mashed or otherwise) and vegetables of your choice and you would have a full meal. The best part are the leftovers, which makes for delicious sandwiches or toppings on your pasta, soups, salads – the possibilities are endless.

read more …

Coconutiest Coconut Cake

July 6, 2014

20140331_171612 When I was a little girl, I was not very fond of coconut. There was something too coconutty about coconut flavours that it overwhelms my tastebuds. I was a child, my sense of taste wasn’t fully developed to appreciate the flavour of coconut – at least that was my excuse. It wasn’t till I was a bit older that I realized it; I wasn’t disliking coconut, I was just disliking the flavours of the processed extract of coconut. Fresh coconut, it’s flesh and water, virgin or otherwise transformed, I do very much like. It was probably very telling when I liked certain coconut products but not all. And I am glad to report, I do like coconut after all. And since that one time I saw a cake, iced in glorious white flakes, I have been wanting (dying) to make a coconut cake with all it’s glory. :) My version of a coconut cake is a dense but light (I’ll get to that in a bit) cake with an Italian meringue icing flavour with my homemade coconut extract! I got that idea from Alton Brown. I had researched a lot of recipes, of cakes and icings, and I came up with this recipe as an adaptation to every awesomest cakes out there. I call this my own version of a coconutiest coconut cake. Be forewarned, you’ll need to think about this cake a week in advance if you want to make it with your own homemade coconut extract (recipe below). You could skip the extract too, it just won’t be the “coconutiest coconut cake” any more, it’d just be “coconut cake”.

read more …

Basil Pesto with Sunflower Seeds

June 29, 2014

20140622_132738 My basil plant is prolifically producing and I love, love, love the fact that it has tripled in size in this beautiful Vancouver weather. What better way to use basil than to turn it into an all-purpose pesto! You guys are probably used to pesto made with basil and pine nuts but really, pesto can be a combination of any greens/herbs/fruits, nuts, lemon juice, olive oil and grated Parmesan. After all, pesto  just means paste in Italian. With the price of pine nuts going off the roof lately, this is a basil pesto that uses sunflower seeds. If I were you, I’d toast the seeds until they are slightly brown and fragrant but feel free to skip the roasting, if you’re feeling lazy. I don’t like my pesto to be emulsified. It’s a state you’d get if you blitz all the ingredients into a blender. The combination of lemon juice and all the other ingredients turns the paste into a light green cream and I hate that. I want my basil pesto to be a fluid sauce, glistening with oil and with all the finely chopped ingredients visible as you run your spoon in it.  This is my recipe for pesto. :)

read more …

Lemon-Lemon Thyme Cake

May 18, 2014

main

I love lemon desserts. Lemon meringue pie, lemon cream cake, lemon-vanilla pound cake, lemon-anything, actually. Now, this recipe from Nigel Slater might be my favourite lemon dessert recipe to date. The Lemon-Lemon Thyme cake is moist, sweet, lemony and woodsy with the addition of lemon thyme; the lemon-thyme syrup adds to the burst of sunshine on this cake and helps keep it moist as well. I highly recommend using lemon thyme in this recipe but if you can only get regular thyme, that’s fine too. The recipe is pretty straight forward but I’ve tweaked Nigel’s recipe for the cake a little bit by adding more lemon zests.  read more …

Compound Butter Recipe

February 28, 2014

IMG_20140228_013133I love compound butters. A dollop of these flavoured butter goodness can take any dish through the roof. What is compound butter? It may sound fancy but that cannot be further from the truth, it’s basically butter mixed with whatever herbs you have at hand. Garlic butter is an example of a compound butter, and I am sure you know how delicious it is when slathered onto toasts. You can easily make your own flavoured compound butter at home. Store it in the freezer and it freezes well for up to a year and when you want to use it, just open the packaging and cut a few chunks out. In the fridge, depending on what herbs you used, it can last quite a long while too. I just wouldn’t recommend storing your compound butter in the fridge for long periods of time if you used a lot of fresh herbs.

IMG_20140228_013108

This is my version of compound butter, made in a food processor. You can also make it by hand, you just need to make sure your butter is soft and your herbs finely chopped. And you should make a lot of compound butter, especially when butter goes on sale. ;)  read more …

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...